The First Texas Independence, 1813

How much do you know about Texas? This book will provide you with a chapter of Texas history that is not thought in schools. You will learn about the struggles of the first Tejanos to seek independence for themselves and their posterity.

I found out about this book when I received an email form it’s author. He did not ask me to mention his books but after reading this one I had to share it with you. Mr. Lopez sent me an email to tell me more about the Gutierrez de Lara in particular Don Bernardo Gutierrez de Lara whom I had recently written a blog post about “Jose Bernardo Gutierrez de Lara“. He also shared a post that he wrote for the Rio Grande Guardian titled “The String of Pearls of the Lower Rio Grande”.

If your ancestors were from Revilla this book will be of great interest to you. It will also be of great interest to any history buff and also to anyone whose ancestors where form the surrounding area of Revilla. Provides great insight into the areas turmoil during Mexicos Independence struggle. Mr, Lopez connects the dots of history beautifully.

The First Texas Independence, 1813

Here is a summary of this awesome book.

The story of Texas independence is older than the one told in mainstream Texas history and taught to our children in Texas classrooms. That view presumes that Texas independence begins in 1836 with the arrival of Anglo immigrants from the U.S. The truth is that on September 16, 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo lit the spark of Texas liberty with his “Grito” (call for revolution) heard round the world. In Texas, a key region of Mexico, the Grito was heard loud and clear!

Don José Bernardo Gutiérrez de Lara, a young rancher from Revilla, Nuevo Santander in the Lower Rio Grande Villas del Norte answered the call against oppressive Spanish colonial policies. Against great odds, this brilliant, charismatic leader organized the Army of the North (First Texas Army) that included Tejanos, Native American allies, and U.S. Anglo volunteers. Then, he led his army in defeating the much superior Spanish Army in five battles.

He subsequently brought the first taste of independence to the jubilant citizens of Texas. He became the first President of the independent province of Texas, wrote and signed the first Texas Declaration of Independence (April 6, 1813), and signed the First Texas Constitution on April 17, 1813. The Tejano Green Flag symbolizes what he offered the citizens of Texas: the first breathe of a new life, the first step of a long journey, and the sign of a new beginning.

The bilingual book, “The First Texas Independence, 1813” (La primera independencia de Tejas, 1813), takes the reader from Don Bernardo’s early life in his small hometown of Revilla (now the Guerrero, Tamaulipas and Zapata, Texas community) to the end of his incredible journey.

Equally important, this book does two things. First, it helps preserve early Texas history. Second, it adds the long-missing first chapters in Texas history. No longer can mainstream historians ignore the fact that Texas independence has Spanish Mexican roots. In that respect, the book gives Mexican-descent students a well-earned and deserved ownership of Texas history. Hopefully, these descendants of the first citizens of Texas will hold their heads high, stay in school, graduate from a four-year university, and become productive members of their community. ¡Si se puede!

Where to buy this book:

About the Author Jose Antonio Lopez:

José “Joe” Antonio López was born and raised in Laredo, Texas, and is a USAF Veteran. He now lives in Universal City, Texas. He is the author of three books: “The Last Knight (Don Bernardo Gutierrez de Lara Uribe, A Texas Hero),” “Nights of Wailing, Days of Pain (Life in 1920s South Texas).” and, “The First Texas Independence, 1813.” Lopez is also the founder of the Tejano Learning Center, LLC, and www.tejanosunidos.org, a Web site dedicated to Spanish Mexican people and events in U.S. history that are mostly overlooked in mainstream history books

About Moises Garza

This blog is an attempt to document my family and make you aware of resources that I find. I also hope that with this blog I can network with other researchers interested in this region and connect with long lost relatives. To keep up to date with this blog follow us with RSS feed, Twitter, Facebook, or Google+. Contact me at moisesgarza@gmail.com

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